in the centre of it all

Natural Attractions

NATURAL ATTRACTIONS

MIDDLESEX CENTRE OFFERS MANY SCENIC NATURAL ATTRACTIONS FOR RESIDENTS AND VISITORS ALIKE. 
FROM HIKING TRAILS TO CONSERVATION AREAS, THE OPPORTUNITY TO ENJOY THE OUTDOORS IS YOURS.

Being a largely rural municipality, Middlesex Centre offers many scenic natural attractions for residents and visitors alike. From hiking trails to conservation areas, the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors is yours.

Komoka Provincial Park

“This provincial park straddles the municipal boundaries of the City of London and Municipality of Middlesex Centre. Land acquisition began in the early 1970s, and 198 hectares were regulated in 1989 under the former Provincial Parks Act. The park protects a portion of the Thames River, a Canadian Heritage River in addition to significant natural heritage features including species at risk.

The park provides low-intensity, self-interpretive day-use recreational opportunities for visitors, including hiking and nature appreciation, wildlife viewing, and photography.

The park's trail system is accessible year round and is considered a near-urban provincial park. Users can experience nature and sense of solitude minutes from their homes. In addition, the park protects significant natural heritage resources in a highly developed area of the province for the benefit of future generations.  The park is important to local residents and visitors as it is an easily accessible space that provides high quality outdoor recreation opportunities." - Excerpt from Great Places in Canada

Ontario Parks - Komoka

Sharon Creek Conservation Area

Springer Rd, Delaware, Ontario

Sharon Creek Conservation Area has 35.6 hectares of water and 12.9 hectares of forest, grassland, wooded ravines, a small wetland and a tallgrass prairie.

Picnicking, birdwatching, hiking, fishing and canoeing are enjoyed by many visitors. Conservation-oriented group camping is available by reservation only. Call for reservations 519-264-2420. Swimming in the reservoir is unsupervised. The park is open 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. all year, free of charge.

The dam is an "earthen dam" with a morning-glory spillway which has a capacity for a 1 in 10 year regional storm. Another spillway accommodates extra water capacities assuring the dam remains intact. These spillways have a capacity for a 1 in a 100 year storm. -  Excerpt from Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority

Coldstream Conservation Area

Quaker Lane, Poplar Hill/Coldstream, Ontario

Coldstream Conservation Area is near the bend of the Sydenham River and includes cold springs which feed an old cedar swamp and the river itself. The site contains a Class I provincially significant wetland, reservoir, floodplain woods, a re-vegetated gravel pit and an upland deciduous woodlot as well as a day use area, playground, and soccer field. Wildflowers are plentiful in all areas.

The Coldstream Conservation Area has two trails - the trail in the south end of the Conservation Area takes you through a cedar swamp, a rare experience in Southwestern Ontario. The trail north of Coldstream Road is a wonderful place for spring wildflowers and birds.

St. Clair Region Conservation Authority

Fishing

The Thames River has approximately 94 species of fish mainly due to the fact that it provides a range of habitats, favorable climate, nutrient-rich waters and a connection with the Great Lakes. The Thames River is relatively wide that is slow moving, deep with infrequent fast flowing shallow sections that many fish such as Walleye, White Bass and Small Mouth Bass prefer. – via Tourism Middlesex

Links

Upper Thames River Conservation Authority
Lower Thames River Conservation Authority
St. Clair Region Conservation Authority
Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority
Kettle Creek Conservation Authority